Profiling the Candidates for the 2010 Presidential Elections: Manny Villar

Full Name: Manuel “Manny” Bamba Villar Jr.
Born: December 13, 1949
Parents: Manuel Montalban Villar, Sr. and Curita Bamba
Religion: Roman Catholic

Current Position: Senator of the Republic of the Philippines

Political Party: Nacionalista Party
Running Mate: Loren Legarda

Senators:

  • Pia Cayetano
  • Bongbong Marcos
  • Liza Maza
  • Mon-mon Mitra
  • Satur Ocampo
  • Susan Ople
  • Gwen Pimentel
  • Ariel Querubin
  • Gilbert Remulla
  • Bong Revilla
  • Miriam Defensor Santiago
  • Adel Tamano

Brief History

Manuel Bamba Villar, Jr. was born on December 13, 1949 in Tondo, an impoverished and densely populated district of Manila. His father, Manuel Montalban Villar, Sr., was from Cabatuan, Iloilo and his mother Curita Bamba came from Orani, Bataan. The family lived in a small rented apartment located in a run-down slum area.

As a child, Villar attended Holy Child Catholic School, a private Catholic school in Tondo. He also assisted his mother in selling seafood at the Divisoria Public Market in order to help earn the money to support his siblings and himself to school. He finished his high school education at the Mapúa Institute of Technology in Intramuros. He attended the University of the Philippines – Diliman and earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1970. He returned to the same school to earn his master’s degree in business administration in 1973. He later characterized himself as being impatient with formal schooling, and eager to start working and go into business.

As of 2009, he is the 9th wealthiest person in the Philippines with a net worth of US$530 million according to Forbes.

Life in Politics

Villar entered politics in 1992 when he was elected to the House of Representatives, representing the district of Las Piñas-Muntinlupa (and later the district of Las Piñas City). He served for three consecutive three-year terms, consistently posting landslide election victories.

Villar was chosen Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1998. As speaker, he presided over the impeachment of President Joseph Estrada over corruption allegations in November 2000. Along with a large group of lawmakers which include the Senate President, Villar defected from Estrada’s Laban ng Makabayang Masang Pilipino coalition in order to hasten the process of impeachment. Seconds after the opening prayer, and skipping the traditional roll call, he immediately read a resolution sending the impeachment case to the Senate for trial, bypassing a full vote and ignoring attempts by Estrada allies to delay the proceedings.[8] Hours after the impeachment proceedings, congressmen allied with the president led a move to oust Villar from his post as speaker, replacing him with Estrada ally Arnulfo Fuentebella.

In 2001, barred by constitutional term limits from seeking re-election to a fourth term in the House of Representatives, Villar was succeeded by his wife, Cynthia Villar.

Villar was elected to the Senate in 2001, and later won re-election in 2007.

In July 2006, Villar was chosen Senate President. He had previously held the position of Senate President pro tempore, as well as the chairmanship of the Committees on Finance, Foreign Relations, Public Order, and Committee on Agriculture and Fisheries. In November 2008, he resigned the position due to a lack of support in the Senate, and was succeeded by Juan Ponce Enrile.

Politics

Sipag at Tiyaga

Platform

Anti-Poverty Platform

Manny Villar does not make promises alone. Although he has made poverty alleviation a top priority, he knows this is something that everyone, including the poor themselves, must strive for and work towards. He is just keeping it real and being honest about it.

This is his powerful message to the masses who are always mired in poverty, one administration after another. Many people say that corruption causes poverty. While this is surely true, it is also more the other way around : poverty causes corruption. Root out poverty, empower the people with the means to live well and rise above their station in life, and you can eliminate the need to beg, to steal, to kill. It is certainly important to eliminate corruption, especially those that happen in high places because they affect the most people. But equally important is the need to address the heart of poverty. And the inequitable distribution of wealth and access to it lies at the heart of this matter including his entrepreneurial revolution.

My 2cents on Manny Villar

Oo na, ikaw na ang mahirap!

That is what some people who has gotten tired of Manny Villar’s political ads are shouting. And they have a good reason to do so. Mainly because, if I counted correctly, he has, at least, three different kinds of ads with variations of each.

This list includes:

  1. the singing children,
  2. Michael V., and
  3. Dolphy.

But the number of this many different ads is not the main issue. At least, that is the case for me. The main issue would be how many times these advertisements are shown on TV. I may be exaggerating but I can say that in almost every block of ads, one of his appears. The thing is, how much does it cost for an ad to be shown on TV? I can say that it will be on the line of millions. Maybe, some people wouldn’t care about that part but this much expense is a very huge issue.

But, apparently, they’re working for him given the results of the surveys as shown in the news.

And, given said surveys, we can readily tell that he has a very high winning chance at this elections.

What can we really expect from someone who keeps on telling people about who the real poor is?

Sources: Wikipedia, PoliticalArena PH, MannyVillar.com.ph

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2 thoughts on “Profiling the Candidates for the 2010 Presidential Elections: Manny Villar

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